Performances

Bass & Word - 2:07pm Oct 8th, 2016

I have always been infatuated with the power words can have when they are interpreted – when their meanings and sounds are probed and illustrated.
For the last 7 years or so, I have had the pleasure to perform with contrabass explorer Bertram Turetzky in a project we call Bass & Word. He brings his majestic bass and I bring printouts of the words to poems that particularly speak to me, and resonate with some realness and truth. The structure is simple: we decide who starts, either I begin to read or he sets a tone on the bass and then . . . . then, we just go. Nothing is rehearsed or preconceived. We just listen to each other and let whatever happens happen in the moment. Each time is different and unique. It is an improvisatory thrill for me to go on these journeys with him, interpreting, adapting, probing the sounds, searching for originality, new ways to underline the truth. You can’t do this, go where we go, with just anyone. A certain sense of mutual trust has to exist, a willingness to let everything else go in search for something new. But Bert and I are relentless brothers, indeed like the proverbial “twin sons of different mothers” – wandering eagerly into that sonic no man’s land.
So we have gathered a few pieces, recorded over the past few years, into an album.
As always, you can listen to them, or download them freely here.
Or find them on iTunes, Spotify, YouTube (more coming soon) – as is your want.
Or buy the physical CD HERE

I welcome any suggestions – favorite poems or prose – for fun future excursions.
Hit me.

San Diego Troubadour REVIEW
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ALBUM CREDITS
recorded live at:
San Diego State University (thanks to Tim Powell)
MiraCosta College (thanks to Dan Siegel)
University of California San Diego (thanks to Josef Kucera)
Ikezi Music Foundation (thanks to Hiro Ikezi)
all songs mixed and mastered by Peter Carpentier

“The Mulberry Tree” painting: Nona Perrin
photos: Dennis Reiter
album and poster design: Jamie Shadowlight
dedicated to Fred W. Syburg